healtheo360 Wellness Blog

Understanding Cardiology and Heart Disease

Posted by healtheo360 on Feb 14, 2017 4:51:38 PM

Understanding Cardiology and Heart Disease: Cardiology is a field of medicine concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the heart and blood vessels. Common cardiovascular conditions include coronary artery disease, heart attack, heart failure, and more.

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Four Ways to Get Your Vitamin D from Food and Sun

Posted by healtheo360 on Apr 12, 2014 12:09:55 PM

loongar/Thinkstock (NEW YORK) -- Spring is here, and there’s no better time to work vitamin D into your daily routine.

The so-called sunshine nutrient is crucial for healthy bones and it might even stave off the country’s top killers: cancer and heart disease.

Sure, you could pop a supplement. But why not get your vitamin D the old-fashioned way: from good food and a bit of sun? Your body and wallet will thank you.Here's how:

Get a Boost at Breakfast for Vitamin D

Breakfast is a great time to get your vitamin D fix. Morning favorites like eggs, cereal, milk, yogurt and orange juice are packed with the nutrient. In fact, a bowl of cereal with milk and a cup of fortified OJ can deliver up to 75 percent of your recommended daily intake, according to the National Institutes of Health. Better yet: Make it brunch and take it outside. The late morning sun will up your dose of vitamin D.

Soak Up Some Sun for Vitamin D -- But Not Too Much

It’s true: sunlight converts chemicals in your skin into vitamin D. But don’t overdo it, because the same UV rays that work vitamin magic also raise the risk of skin cancer. Fifteen minutes of direct sunlight to the face, arms, back or legs three times a week is enough, according to the NIH. So cover up, find shade or slather on some sunscreen beyond that.

Feast on Fish for Vitamin D

Breakfast foods are good but nothing beats fish for vitamin D. Just three ounces of salmon packs a whopping 112 percent of your recommended daily intake, according to the NIH. Throw it on the barbecue outside for an added boost of vitamin D. Too busy to cook up salmon? Canned cooked tuna is an easy alternative with almost 40 percent of your recommended daily intake.

Stir Up a Smoothie for Vitamin D

Why not drink your vitamin D? Most milk is fortified with vitamin D, delivering nearly a third of your recommended daily intake. And yogurt packs a cool 20 percent. Toss in some fruit and voila: a delicious, nutritious treat.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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Move Over Statins: Legumes Are Nature’s Cholesterol Busters

Posted by healtheo360 on Apr 7, 2014 4:43:38 PM
iStock/Thinkstock (NEW YORK) -- A serving of legumes a day may keep bad cholesterol at bay, a new study has found.

Researchers in the United States and Canada have found that daily consumption of non-oil-seed legumes – like chickpeas, lentils or peas – can significantly reduce “bad cholesterol” and cut the risk of heart disease.

People who ate one three-quarter-cup serving of legumes daily had a 5-percent reduction in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels – a decrease that suggests a 5- to 6-percent reduced risk of major vascular events such as heart attack and stroke.

“Legumes are generally considered healthy, but there [are no guidelines] about their intake from public policy officials,” said Dr. John Sievenpiper of the Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Center in Canada, lead author of the study published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Sievenpiper added that “legumes can complement statins” in the fight against cholesterol, serving as a crucial ingredient in “a healthy diet portfolio” for the general population, regardless of heart disease.

Nutritionists and preventive cardiologists not involved in the research said the new findings were noteworthy.

“It is a well-known fact that high-soluble, fiber-rich foods, like legumes, produce significant effects on LDL numbers and actually add to the cholesterol-lowering effects of statins,” said Dr. Chip Lavie, medical director of Cardiac Rehabilitation and Preventive Cardiology at Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute in Louisiana.

Lavie added that while a 5-percent reduction may not seem huge, studies show that for every 1 percent fall in cholesterol, there is a 1- to 2-percent fall in cardiovascular risk.

“People should seriously think about adopting legumes in their diet,” he said. “The LDL-lowering effect aside, it’s a healthy thing to be doing, anyway.”

Dr. Walter Willett, a nutritionist and epidemiologist at The Harvard School of Public Health, agreed.

“[The study] appears to be a useful summary of the literature on metabolic effects of legume consumption and suggests that there are benefits, especially if beans or other legumes replace red meat,” Willett said.

There may be another benefit, as well – to the environment. Willett said that if more Americans replaced some of the red meat they eat with legumes, it could cut greenhouse gas production and other adverse environmental effects linked to livestock production.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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College Football Players Have Stiffer Arteries, Study Finds

Posted by healtheo360 on Apr 3, 2014 5:13:19 PM

WEDNESDAY, April 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- College football players show signs of having stiffer blood vessels than their leaner peers who don't play football, according to new research.

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Too Much Running Tied to Shorter Lifespan

Posted by healtheo360 on Apr 1, 2014 10:42:59 AM

TUESDAY, April 1 (HealthDay News) -- There is a host of health benefits of running, including weight control, stress reduction, better blood pressure and cholesterol.

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Moms Who Keep 'Baby Weight' May Risk Heart Trouble

Posted by healtheo360 on Mar 25, 2014 3:27:24 PM

TUESDAY, March 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- New mothers who gain too much "baby weight" in the year after they give birth are at increased risk for diabetes and heart disease, researchers warn.

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Supplements No Guard Against Country’s Top Killers

Posted by healtheo360 on Mar 23, 2014 3:32:18 PM

Sorin Popa/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The millions of Americans who take daily supplements may be doing nothing to cut their risk of cancer and heart disease, according to updated guidelines released Monday by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF).

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Double Duty Drug: Statins May Fight MS

Posted by healtheo360 on Mar 22, 2014 3:14:46 PM

Jaykayl/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Cholesterol-busting statins may have an unexpected benefit for patients with multiple sclerosis, a new study found.

Researchers in the U.K. studied 140 patients diagnosed with the most severe form of the disease, known as secondary progressive MS. They found that high doses of statins -- about double the average amount that patients take to keep their cholesterol levels in check -- reduced the rate of brain shrinkage in these patients.

“I see hundreds of patients with secondary progressive MS in my clinic,” said Dr. Jeremy Chataway, a neurologist at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery in London and lead author of the study, published Tuesday in The Lancet.

“These patients are physically disabled and have no treatment,” Chataway added, calling the study ”an exciting first step.”

Statin treatment led to a 43 percent reduction in the rate of brain shrinkage in the patients in the study, according to Chataway. The hope is that putting the brakes on this shrinkage will slow the progression toward physical disability.

Neurology experts not involved with the research said the new findings are promising -- but preliminary.

“Patients with secondary progressive MS are usually a step away from a cane, or already bed-bound or in a wheelchair,” said Dr. John Cobroy, professor of neurology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. The study is both well-executed and interesting, he said, but added that he feels the results should be further analyzed in advanced trials before doctors rush to give statins to all patients with MS.

While past research has suggested that the anti-inflammatory properties of statins may curb the damage in the brain seen in MS, researchers are still steps away from a full understanding of this relationship. Still, if statins -- a widely used drug with a good safety profile -- prove to have benefits against MS as well, they may be a welcome option against a disease for which treatments are so sparse.

This study “gives us first indications for treating and helping restore what’s potentially lost,” said Dr. Timothy Coetzee of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. “It’s proof of concept that you can take an existing strategy and repurpose it to target something else.”Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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Doctor Disputes Benefits of Omega-3 in Fish, Corn and Sunflower Oils

Posted by healtheo360 on Mar 18, 2014 9:58:01 AM

sirastock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Omega-3 may not be the wonderful supplement that health experts have touted for years.

In fact, Rajiv Chowdhury, a cardiovascular epidemiologist from the University of Cambridge, says in a new study that these polyunsaturated fatty acids don't really reduce the risk of contracting heart disease as previously reported.

His research flies in the face of nutritional recommendations by the American Heart Association and other groups that encourage people to consume omega-3, which is found in fish, and omega-6, contained in corn and sunflower oils.

Chowdhury based his findings on a previous study that showed taking fish oil after heart surgery doesn't stop irregular heartbeats that cause blood clots and strokes.

He also pointed to 20 trials over 24 years published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in 2012 that fish oil had no discernible effect in lowering the risk of heart attacks, strokes and death.

The study on the limited heart benefits of omega-3 and omega-six appears in the latest issue of Annals of Internal Medicine.Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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Alzheimer's toll may rank with cancer, heart disease

Posted by healtheo360 on Mar 6, 2014 11:16:58 AM

Alzheimer's disease ravages the brain, robbing its victims not only of their memories but often their ability to do things as basic as swallowing.

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