healtheo360 Wellness Blog

Dangers of Smoking Cigarettes: What You Need to Know

Posted by healtheo360 on Feb 24, 2016 2:37:00 PM

Cigarette smoking is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States. Smoking causes about 90% of all lung cancer deaths in the United States. Cigarette smoke harms almost every part of the body, causing many diseases. Cigarettes/tobacco contain many harmful chemicals. Did you know that cigarette smoking and exposure to tobacco smoke causes about 480,000 deaths year?

Health Effects of the Smoker

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Cardiac Rehabilitation Week 14th – 20th

Posted by healtheo360 on Feb 15, 2016 12:07:00 PM

Did you know that every year 935,000 Americans have a coronary event? Cardiac rehabilitation week is intended to bring about awareness concerning the importance of cardiac rehabilitation and its ability to reduce the possible overwhelming effects of heart disease.

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National Wear Red Day

Posted by healtheo360 on Feb 5, 2016 12:34:37 AM

 

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Heart Disease In Women

Posted by healtheo360 on Oct 31, 2014 1:00:11 AM

It is important to catch the early signs of heart disease, however these signs are different in men and women. For women, age becomes a risk factor at 55, however some women have some form of heart disease at younger ages. Currently, cardiovascular disease (CVD) affects 90% of adults and is the leading cause of death in women. A recent study led by Dr. Cheng of Brigham and Women’s hospital in Boston found that CVD affects more “women and blacks than men and whites”. Reasons for the glaring differences in diagnoses between gender and race are still unknown.

 

The most commonly recognized symptoms are chest pain, pressure or discomfort (angina). Unlike the sign we often see in movies - a man clutching his chest-  CVD in women tends to be less obvious, hence it’s commonly called the ‘silent killer’. This pain arises when the heart is getting too little or no blood.

 

What is CVD?

The collective term is used to describe a number of problems affecting the heart and its blood vessels. The most common type of heart disease is coronary artery disease (CAD) and is the leading cause of heart attacks. Among women, African Americans have higher instances of heart disease.  It affects twice as many black women than white women. Some factors contributing this difference include higher rates of obesity or overweight,  higher levels of elevated cholesterol and blood pressure. Limited awareness of the risk factors also add to this statistic.

 

There are a number of things that can help you reduce the risk of developing heart disease:

  1. Eat healthy
  • Choose foods that are low salt or low sodium
  • Limit foods that have ‘trans fats’ as too much of this can clog arteries and cause heart attacks
  • Cut back on sugary products - they are also labeled as glucose, fructose, sucrose and corn syrup
  • Reading the nutrition facts on the food label can help you make healthy choices
  1. Managing health conditions
  • Take your medications as directed; only stop when you’re instructed by your doctor
  • If you have diabetes, always check your blood sugar level
  • Get your cholesterol and blood pressure checked regularly
  • Ask your doctor how you can safely manage your condition when you’re pregnant
  • As some women need a device to help their heart work, talk to your doctor about what device is better for your heart condition

 

Know The Signs

  • Chest pain or discomfort
  • Unusual upper body discomfort
  • Shortness of breath
  • Breaking out in a cold sweat
  • Unusual and unexplained tiredness
  • Sudden dizziness or lightheadedness
  • Nausea - feeling sick to the stomach 

Unfortunately, recent research shows that women delay seeking medical help when they experience symptoms of heart disease. This is especially so when it comes to heart attacks. Recent research looking at more the 200 subjects found that women are one and a half times more likely to wait longer  than men do to seek help. By this time, symptoms become severe and therefore deadlier. The American Heart Association recommends calling 911 immediately if you experience one or more of these heart attack symptoms. It may save your life.

 

Join Our Heart Disease  Support Group

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women and heart disease: Learn The Symptoms

Posted by healtheo360 on Oct 23, 2014 3:32:09 PM

It is important to catch the early signs of heart disease, however these signs present in different ways in men and women. For women, age becomes a risk factor at 55, however some women have some form of heart disease at younger ages. Currently, cardiovascular disease (CVD) affects 90% of adults and is the leading cause of death in women. A recent study led by Dr. Cheng of Brigham and Women’s hospital in Boston found that CVD affects more “women and blacks than men and whites”. Reasons for the glaring differences in diagnoses between gender and race are still unknown.

The most commonly recognized symptoms are chest pain, pressure or discomfort (angina). Unlike the sign we often see in movies - a man clutching his chest-  CVD in women tends to be less obvious, hence it’s commonly called the ‘silent killer’. In both instances, this chest discomfort is caused by the lack of sufficient blood supply to the heart. 

What is CVD?

The collective term CVD is used to describe a number of problems affecting the heart and its blood vessels. The most common type of heart disease is coronary artery disease (CAD) and is the leading cause of heart attacks. Among women, African Americans have higher instances of heart disease.  It affects twice as many black women than white women. Some factors contributing this difference include higher rates of obesity or being overweight, higher levels of elevated cholesterol and blood pressure. Limited awareness of the risk factors also add to this statistic.

When it comes to women and heart disease, there are a number of things that you can do now to reduce your risks:

  1. Eat healthy
  • Get checked regularly
  • Reading the nutrition facts on the food label can help you make healthy choices.
  • Limit foods that have ‘trans fats’ as too much of this can clog arteries and cause heart attacks. Try these healthy budget friendly diets 
  • Cut back on sugary products. They are also labeled as containing glucose, fructose, sucrose or  corn syrup
  1. Managing health conditions

Common health conditions such as diabetes, high cholesterol and high blood pressure can increase risk of heart disease. Make sure to stay on top of things by:

  • Taking your medications as directed; only stop when you're instructed by your doctor
  • If you have diabetes, always check your blood sugar level
  • Having your cholesterol and blood pressure checked regularly
  • Asking your doctor how you can safely manage your condition when you're pregnant
  • Talking to your doctor about what device is better for your heart condition can help manage your condition better

Know The Symptoms Of A Heart Attack In Women

  • Chest pain or discomfort
  • Unusual upper body discomfort
  • Shortness of breath
  • Breaking out in a cold sweat
  • Unusual and unexplained tiredness
  • Sudden dizziness or lightheadedness
  • Nausea - feeling sick to the stomach

The American Heart Association recommends calling 911 immediately if you experience one or more of these heart attack symptoms. It may save yours or the life of someone you love.

 

 

Join Our Heart Disease  Support Group

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Move Over Statins: Legumes Are Nature’s Cholesterol Busters

Posted by healtheo360 on Apr 7, 2014 4:43:38 PM
iStock/Thinkstock (NEW YORK) -- A serving of legumes a day may keep bad cholesterol at bay, a new study has found.

Researchers in the United States and Canada have found that daily consumption of non-oil-seed legumes – like chickpeas, lentils or peas – can significantly reduce “bad cholesterol” and cut the risk of heart disease.

People who ate one three-quarter-cup serving of legumes daily had a 5-percent reduction in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels – a decrease that suggests a 5- to 6-percent reduced risk of major vascular events such as heart attack and stroke.

“Legumes are generally considered healthy, but there [are no guidelines] about their intake from public policy officials,” said Dr. John Sievenpiper of the Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Center in Canada, lead author of the study published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Sievenpiper added that “legumes can complement statins” in the fight against cholesterol, serving as a crucial ingredient in “a healthy diet portfolio” for the general population, regardless of heart disease.

Nutritionists and preventive cardiologists not involved in the research said the new findings were noteworthy.

“It is a well-known fact that high-soluble, fiber-rich foods, like legumes, produce significant effects on LDL numbers and actually add to the cholesterol-lowering effects of statins,” said Dr. Chip Lavie, medical director of Cardiac Rehabilitation and Preventive Cardiology at Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute in Louisiana.

Lavie added that while a 5-percent reduction may not seem huge, studies show that for every 1 percent fall in cholesterol, there is a 1- to 2-percent fall in cardiovascular risk.

“People should seriously think about adopting legumes in their diet,” he said. “The LDL-lowering effect aside, it’s a healthy thing to be doing, anyway.”

Dr. Walter Willett, a nutritionist and epidemiologist at The Harvard School of Public Health, agreed.

“[The study] appears to be a useful summary of the literature on metabolic effects of legume consumption and suggests that there are benefits, especially if beans or other legumes replace red meat,” Willett said.

There may be another benefit, as well – to the environment. Willett said that if more Americans replaced some of the red meat they eat with legumes, it could cut greenhouse gas production and other adverse environmental effects linked to livestock production.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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Too Much Running Tied to Shorter Lifespan

Posted by healtheo360 on Apr 1, 2014 10:42:59 AM

TUESDAY, April 1 (HealthDay News) -- There is a host of health benefits of running, including weight control, stress reduction, better blood pressure and cholesterol.

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Double Duty Drug: Statins May Fight MS

Posted by healtheo360 on Mar 22, 2014 3:14:46 PM

Jaykayl/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Cholesterol-busting statins may have an unexpected benefit for patients with multiple sclerosis, a new study found.

Researchers in the U.K. studied 140 patients diagnosed with the most severe form of the disease, known as secondary progressive MS. They found that high doses of statins -- about double the average amount that patients take to keep their cholesterol levels in check -- reduced the rate of brain shrinkage in these patients.

“I see hundreds of patients with secondary progressive MS in my clinic,” said Dr. Jeremy Chataway, a neurologist at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery in London and lead author of the study, published Tuesday in The Lancet.

“These patients are physically disabled and have no treatment,” Chataway added, calling the study ”an exciting first step.”

Statin treatment led to a 43 percent reduction in the rate of brain shrinkage in the patients in the study, according to Chataway. The hope is that putting the brakes on this shrinkage will slow the progression toward physical disability.

Neurology experts not involved with the research said the new findings are promising -- but preliminary.

“Patients with secondary progressive MS are usually a step away from a cane, or already bed-bound or in a wheelchair,” said Dr. John Cobroy, professor of neurology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. The study is both well-executed and interesting, he said, but added that he feels the results should be further analyzed in advanced trials before doctors rush to give statins to all patients with MS.

While past research has suggested that the anti-inflammatory properties of statins may curb the damage in the brain seen in MS, researchers are still steps away from a full understanding of this relationship. Still, if statins -- a widely used drug with a good safety profile -- prove to have benefits against MS as well, they may be a welcome option against a disease for which treatments are so sparse.

This study “gives us first indications for treating and helping restore what’s potentially lost,” said Dr. Timothy Coetzee of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. “It’s proof of concept that you can take an existing strategy and repurpose it to target something else.”Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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Risk Factors For Heart Disease

Posted by healtheo360 on Jan 18, 2014 5:52:47 PM

The risk factors for heart disease increases with age,but there are other variables to consider. Below are some of the common key risk factors of heart disease.

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Extra Steps May Help Lower Risk of Heart Attack

Posted by Team healtheo360 on Dec 28, 2013 9:07:46 AM

Craig Veltri/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Everyone knows an apple a day keeps the doctor away, but a new study shows an extra 2,000 steps can also keep the doc at bay.

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